Virtual tour of Nuremberg. Panorama of Nuremberg. Maps, travel, photos, videos.

 [+]
Description  panorama

Nuremberg

POI: 49.455556, 11.078611
Nuremberg (/ˈnjʊərəmbɜːrɡ/; German: Nürnberg; pronounced [ˈnʏɐ̯nbɛɐ̯k]) is a city on the river Pegnitz and the Rhine–Main–Danube Canal in the German state of Bavaria, in the administrative region of Middle Franconia, about 170 kilometres (110 mi) north of Munich. It is the second-largest city in Bavaria (after Munich), and the largest in Franconia (Franken). The population as of February 2015, is 517,498, which makes it Germany's fourteenth-largest city. The urban area also includes Fürth, Erlangen and Schwabach with a total population of 763,854. The "European Metropolitan Area Nuremberg" has ca. 3.5 million inhabitants.
History
Middle Ages
Nuremberg was, according to the first documentary mention of the city in 1050, the location of an Imperial castle between the East Franks and the Bavarian March of the Nordgau. From 1050 to 1571, the city expanded and rose dramatically in importance due to its location on key trade routes. King Conrad III established a burgraviate, with the first burgraves coming from the Austrian House of Raab but, with the extinction of their male line around 1190, the burgraviate was inherited by the last count's son-in-law, of the House of Hohenzollern. From the late 12th century to the Interregnum (1254–73), however, the power of the burgraves diminished as the Hohenstaufen emperors transferred most non-military powers to a castellan, with the city administration and the municipal courts handed over to an Imperial mayor (German: Reichsschultheiß) from 1173/74. The strained relations between the burgraves and the castellan, with gradual transferral of powers to the latter in the late 14th and early 15th centuries, finally broke out into open enmity, which greatly influenced the history of the city. Nuremberg is often referred to as having been the 'unofficial capital' of the Holy Roman Empire, particularly because Imperial Diet (Reichstag) and courts met at Nuremberg Castle. The Diets of Nuremberg were an important part of the administrative structure of the empire. The increasing demand of the royal court and the increasing importance of the city attracted increased trade and commerce to Nuremberg. In 1219, Frederick II granted the Großen Freiheitsbrief (Great Letter of Freedom), including town rights, Imperial immediacy (Reichsfreiheit), the privilege to mint coins, and an independent customs policy, almost wholly removing the city from the purview of the burgraves. Nuremberg soon became, with Augsburg, one of the two great trade centers on the route from Italy to Northern Europe. In 1298, the Jews of the town were accused of having desecrated the host, and 698 of them were killed in one of the many Rintfleisch Massacres. Behind the massacre of 1298 was also the desire to combine the northern and southern parts of the city, which were divided by the Pegnitz. The Jews of the German lands suffered many massacres during the plague years. In 1349, Nuremberg's Jews were subjected to a pogrom. They were burned at...   ... (English)
Nürnberg - Deutsch -> English  Norske -> English  Svenska -> English  Magyar -> English  Danske -> English  Suomalainen -> English  
Neurenberg - Nederlandse -> English  
Нюрнберг - Русский -> English  Український -> English  
Nuremberg - Français -> English  Català -> English  
Norymberga - Polska -> English  
Norimberga - Italiano -> English  
Núremberg - Español -> English  
ニュルンベルク - 日本語 -> English  
Norimberk - České -> English  
Нирнберг - Српска -> English  
Nuremberga - Português -> English  
Niurnbergas - Lietuvos -> English  
纽伦堡 - 简体中文 -> English  
by Panoramio
Nürnberg: Martin Behaim
Nürnberg: Martin Behaim
walterswelt
go place
st. Sebald Church, Nurnberg
st. Sebald Church, Nurnberg
JohanBakker
go place
Frauenkirche Nürnberg
Frauenkirche Nürnberg
>Säm2
go place
Frauenkirche en un dia nublado de verano....
Frauenkirche en un dia nublado de verano....
LEIRE13
go place
Egidienkirche Nürnberg
Egidienkirche Nürnberg
Szekér
go place
Frauenkirche
Frauenkirche
© Kojak
go place
Goldener Brunnen in Nürnberg
Goldener Brunnen in Nürnberg
© alfredschaffer
go place