Virtual tour of Altes Stadthaus, Berlin. Panorama of Altes Stadthaus, Berlin. Maps, travel, photos, videos.

 [+]
Description  panorama

Altes Stadthaus, Berlin

POI: 52.516389, 13.410833
Altes Stadthaus ("Old City Hall") is a former administrative building in Berlin, currently used by the Senate. It faces the Molkenmarkt and is bound by four roads; Jüdenstraße, Klosterstraße, Parochialstraße, and Stralauer Straße. Designed by Ludwig Hoffmann, chief of construction for the city, it was built in 1902–11 at a cost of 7 million marks (US$1,750,000) to supplement the Rotes Rathaus. The building has five courtyards and features many sculptures, including 29 allegorical representations of civic virtues and of Greek deities which are mounted on the tower. A Georg Wrba sculpture of a bear, the symbol of Berlin, is located in the central Bärensaal (Bear Hall). Originally called the "Neues Stadthaus" (New City House), it became the seat of the Council of Ministers of the GDR after World War II. The building next to it became the center of administration for East Berlin, and was also called "Neues Stadthaus"; to avoid confusion, Neues Stadthaus became known as "Altes Stadthaus" (Old city house). During World War II, the Allied bombing campaign and fierce fighting in the Battle of Berlin caused severe damage; the roof was almost completely destroyed as were the statues above the rear entrance, and there was substantial water damage. In the first phase of reconstruction in 1951, the statue of the goddess of Fortuna was removed, and is assumed to have been smelted in 1962. The remaining statues, urns, and other carvings on the exterior were removed in 1976–77 due to rain damage. It was completely refurbished in the 1990s and exterior restoration required replacement of some 180 sculptural elements, including the allegorical figures of the virtues, giant vases, window embrasures and one of the columns. The original mansard roof was reconstructed in 1998–99.
Plans for second city hall
In the 1860s, the population of Berlin was growing rapidly with the influx of around 50,000 people a year, creating a large administrative burden. When construction began on the Rotes Rathaus, the city had around half a million inhabitants, but this grew to 800,000 by the time of its completion in 1869. By the 1880s, the city had offices in ten additional buildings near the Rotes Rathaus and since it could not be extended, it was clear that a second administration building was required. In 1893, the executive committee of the Berlin city council proposed a site on the banks of the river Spree, roughly corresponding to the current location of the Berlin Finance Department and the offices of the Social Association of Germany. The proposal was rejected by the full city council because it would overshadow the city hall. Further proposals were put on hold for several years. After discussing many locations, in 1898, chief of construction Ludwig Hoffmann became involved and the council agreed on Molkenmarkt. The 32 built-up parcels of land on the site were bought up and cleared. Based on his participation in the debate and his reputation, Hoffmann received the commission...   ... (English)
Altes Stadthaus (Berlin) - Deutsch -> English  Français -> English  
Altes Stadthaus - Nederlandse -> English  
柏林舊市政廳 - 简体中文 -> English  
by Panoramio
A waved palace
A waved palace
Eric Medvet
go place
Niederländische Botschaft, Berlin
Niederländische Botschaft, Berlin
kanakari-photos.com
go place
CK Waisenstrasse Friedhof, Parochialkirche, Stadthaus
CK Waisenstrasse Friedhof, Parochialkirche, Stadthaus
Carl030nl
go place
Berlin, Mitte
Berlin, Mitte
picture fan
go place
Berlin sunset
Berlin sunset
poludziber
go place
Berliner Dom.
Berliner Dom.
Reiner Vogeley
go place
CK Markisesch Museum
CK Markisesch Museum
Carl030nl
go place