Virtual tour of Battle of Berlin (RAF campaign). Panorama of Battle of Berlin (RAF campaign). Maps, travel, photos, videos.

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Battle of Berlin (RAF campaign)

POI: 52.516667, 13.416667
The Battle of Berlin was the British bombing campaign on Berlin from November 1943 to March 1944. Not limited solely to Berlin, the campaign targeted other German cities as well, to prevent the concentration of defences in Berlin. The campaign was launched by Air Chief Marshal Sir Arthur Harris, AOC of RAF Bomber Command in November 1943. Harris believed this could be the blow that broke German resistance: "We can wreck Berlin from end to end if the USAAF come in with us. It will cost us between 400 and 500 aircraft. It will cost Germany the war". By this time he could deploy over 800 long-range bombers on any given night, equipped with new and more sophisticated navigational devices such as H2S radar. Between November 1943 and March 1944, Bomber Command made 16 massed attacks on Berlin. The USAAF, having recently suffered heavy losses in its attacks on Schweinfurt from which it was still recovering, was unable to participate. It is generally accepted that the Battle of Berlin was a failure for the Royal Air Force (RAF) as it was not the knockout blow that Harris had predicted. The RAF lost 1,047 bombers, with a further 1,682 damaged, and well over 7,000 aircrew, culminating in the raid on Nuremberg on 30 March 1944, when 94 bombers were shot down and 71 were damaged, out of 795 aircraft. There were many other raids on Berlin by the RAF and the USAAF Eighth Air Force in the strategic bombing campaign of 1940–45 and this is reflected in the RAF battle honour, which is for the bombardment of Berlin by aircraft of Bomber Command from 1940–45. In response to attacks on German cities, the Luftwaffe began Operation Steinbock (Capricorn)—a series of attacks on London. The Germans suffered heavy losses, but they persisted until May 1944. Over every mission during Steinbock, attacking formations suffered a higher loss percentage than the RAF sustained over Germany. Although primarily a British operation, Australian and Canadian bomber squadrons also took part in the battle, under the command of RAF Bomber Command.
Battle
The first raid of the battle occurred on the night of 18/19 November 1943. Berlin was the main target and was attacked by 440 Avro Lancaster heavy bombers and four de Havilland Mosquitos. The city was under cloud and the damage was not severe. The second major raid was on the night of 22/23 November. This was the most effective raid on Berlin by the RAF of the war, causing extensive damage to the residential areas west of the centre, Tiergarten and Charlottenburg, Schöneberg and Spandau. Because of the dry weather conditions, several firestorms ignited. Both the Protestant Kaiser Wilhelm Memorial Church, now serving as a war memorial, and the New Synagogue (then used as a store house by the Wehrmacht), were badly damaged on 22 November 1943. In the next nights Bethlehem's Church, John's Church, Lietzow Church, and Trinity Church and on other nights Emperor Frederick Memorial Church, Kirche am Hohenzollernplatz and St. Hedwig's Cathedral...   ... (English)
Bataille aérienne de Berlin - Français -> English  
Powietrzna bitwa o Berlin - Polska -> English  
Battaglia aerea di Berlino - Italiano -> English  
Batalha de Berlim (aérea) - Português -> English  
by Panoramio
Ehemalige Waisenbrücke um 1895
Ehemalige Waisenbrücke um 1895
Damals in Berlin
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CK Waisenstrasse Friedhof, Parochialkirche, Stadthaus
CK Waisenstrasse Friedhof, Parochialkirche, Stadthaus
Carl030nl
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Hochhäuser und Berliner Fernsehturm.
Hochhäuser und Berliner Fernsehturm.
Reiner Vogeley
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BERLIN Alexa Shopping Centre
BERLIN Alexa Shopping Centre
andrevishay
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Berlin, Mitte
Berlin, Mitte
picture fan
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CK Markisesch Museum
CK Markisesch Museum
Carl030nl
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Niederländische Botschaft, Berlin
Niederländische Botschaft, Berlin
kanakari-photos.com
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