Virtual tour of Antibes. Panorama of Antibes. Maps, travel, photos, videos.

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Antibes

POI: 43.583333, 7.116667
Antibes (/ɒnˈtiːb/, French: [ɑ̃.tib]; Provençal Occitan: Antíbol) is a Mediterranean resort in the Alpes-Maritimes department of southeastern France, on the Côte d'Azur between Cannes and Nice. The town of Juan-les-Pins is in the commune of Antibes and the Sophia Antipolis technology park is northwest of it.
History
Origins
Traces of occupation dating back to the early Iron Age have been found in the areas of the castle and cathedral. Under the Holy Spirit Chapel remains show there was an indigenous community with ties to Mediterranean populations, including the Etruscans, as evidenced by the presence of numerous amphorae and wrecks off Antibes. However, most trade was with the Greek world, via the Phocaeans of Marseille.
A Colony of Marseille
Antipolis was founded by Phocaeans from Massilia. As a Greek colony (and Roman) settlement, it was known as Antipolis (Ἀντίπολις, Antípolis, lit. "Cross-City") from its position relative to Nice (anc. Nikaia). Current research suggests that the foundation of Antipolis was relatively late (4th century BC), and related to Marseille protecting its trade routes along the coast by installing strongholds like Olbia at Hyères, or trading posts such as Antipolis and later Nikaia. The exact location of the Greek city is not well known. Given Greek colonial practices, it is likely that it was set at the foot of the rock of Antibes in today's old city. Traces of occupation of the Hellenistic period have been identified around the castle and the church (former cathedral). The goods unearthed during these excavations show the dominance of imported products of the Marseilles region, associated with Campanian and indigenous ceramics. Early in the second century BC the Ligurian Deceates and Oxybiens tribes launched repeated attacks against Nikaia and Antipolis. The Greeks of Marseille appealed to Rome as they had already done a few years earlier against the federation of Salyens. In 154 BC the consul Quintus Opimius defeated the Décéates and Oxybiens and took Aegythna from the Décéates.
Roman Antipolis
Rome gradually increased its hold over the Mediterranean coast. In 43 BC, Antipolis was officially incorporated in the propraetorial (senatorial from 27 BC) province of Narbonesian Gaul, in which it remained for the next 500 years. Antipolis grew into the largest town in the region and a main entry-point into Gaul. Roman artifacts such as aqueducts, fortified walls, and amphoræ can still be seen today.
Aqueducts
The city was supplied with water by two aqueducts. The Fontvieille aqueduct rises in Biot and eventually joins the coast below the RN7 and the railway track at the Fort Carré. It was discovered and restored in the 18th century by the Chevalier d'Aguillon for supplying the modern city. The aqueduct called the Bouillide or Clausonnes rises near the town of Valbonne. Monumental remains of aqueduct bridges are located in the neighbourhood of Fugaret, in the forest of Valmasque and near the...   ... (English)
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by Panoramio
Antibes air view
Antibes air view
Péter Kesselyák
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Antibes Fontain by night, by Per Allan Nielsen
Antibes Fontain by night, by Per Allan Nielsen
Per Allan Nielsen
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Camminando nel vicolo
Camminando nel vicolo
Gaudenzio1962
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Antibes - Marina
Antibes - Marina
renbo
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Antibes - port and Fort Vauban
Antibes - port and Fort Vauban
gpermant
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Antibes
Antibes
Clouseau219
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Antibes
Antibes
Clouseau219
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