Virtual tour of Newgate Prison. Panorama of Newgate Prison. Maps, travel, photos, videos.

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Description  panorama

Newgate Prison

POI: 51.515692, -0.101919
Newgate Prison was a prison in London, at the corner of Newgate Street and Old Bailey just inside the City of London. It was originally located at the site of Newgate, a gate in the Roman London Wall. The gate/prison was rebuilt in the 12th century, and demolished in 1904. The prison was extended and rebuilt many times, and remained in use for over 700 years, from 1188 to 1902.
Early history
In the early 12th century, Henry II instituted legal reforms that gave the Crown more control over the administration of justice. As part of his Assize of Clarendon of 1166, he required the construction of prisons, where the accused would stay while royal judges debated their innocence or guilt and subsequent punishment. In 1188, Newgate was the first institution established to meet that purpose. A few decades later in 1236, in an effort to significantly enlarge the prison, the king converted one of the Newgate turrets, which still functioned as a main gate into the city, into an extension of the prison. The addition included new dungeons and adjacent buildings, which would remain unaltered for roughly two centuries. By the 15th century, however, Newgate was in need of repair. The building was collapsing and decaying, and many prisoners were dying from the close quarters, overcrowding, rampant disease, and bad sanitary conditions. Indeed, one year, 22 prisoners died from "gaol fever." The situation in Newgate was so dire that in 1419, city officials temporarily shut down the prison. Some Londoners bequeathed their estates to repair the prison. Following pressure from reformers who learned that the women’s quarters were too small and did not contain their own bathrooms, thus forcing women to walk through the men’s quarters to reach one, officials added a separate tower and chamber for female prisoners in 1406. Two decades later, the executors of Lord Mayor Dick Whittington were granted a license to renovate the prison in 1422. The gate and gaol were pulled down and rebuilt. There was a new central hall for meals, a new chapel, and the creation of additional chambers and basement cells with no light or ventilation. The prison housed both male and female felons and debtors and separated the prisoners into wards by gender. By the mid-15th century, Newgate could accommodate roughly 300 prisoners. Though the prisoners lived in separate quarters, they mixed freely with each other and visitors to the prison. There were three main wards—the Master’s side for those could afford to pay for their own food and accommodations, the Common side for those who were too poor, and a Press Yard for special prisoners. The king often used Newgate as a holding place for heretics, traitors, and rebellious subjects brought to London for trial. The prison was destroyed in the Great Fire of London in 1666, and was rebuilt in 1672, extending into new buildings on the south side of the street.
Prison Life
All manner of criminals stayed at Newgate. Some committed acts of petty crime...   ... (English)
Newgate-Gefängnis - Deutsch -> English  
Newgate - Nederlandse -> English  
Ньюгетская тюрьма - Русский -> English  
Prison de Newgate - Français -> English  
Więzienie Newgate - Polska -> English  
Ньюгейтська в'язниця - Український -> English  
ニューゲート監獄 - 日本語 -> English  
Newgate fengsel - Norske -> English  
Newgatefängelset - Svenska -> English  
by Panoramio
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London, England
London, England
© Alan Knox
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