Virtual tour of Pula. Panorama of Pula. Maps, travel, photos, videos.

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Pula

POI: 44.866667, 13.850000
Pula or Pola (Croatian pronunciation: [pǔːla]; Italian and Istro-Romanian: Pola; Latin: Colonia Pietas Iulia Pola Pollentia Herculanea; Slovene and Chakavian: Pulj, German: Polei, Ancient Greek: Πόλαι, Polae) is the largest city in Istria County, Croatia, situated at the southern tip of the Istria peninsula, with a population of 57,460 (2011). Like the rest of the region, it is known for its mild climate, smooth sea, and unspoiled nature. The city has a long tradition of winemaking, fishing, shipbuilding, and tourism. It has also been Istria's administrative centre since ancient Roman times.
History
Pre-history
Evidence of the presence of Homo erectus 1 million years ago has been found in the cave of Šandalja near Pula/Pola. Pottery from the Neolithic period (6000–2000 BC), indicating human settlement, has been found around Pula – Pola. In the Bronze Age (1800–1000 BC), a new type of settlement appeared in Istria, called 'gradine', or Hill-top fortifications. Many late Bronze Age bone objects, such as tools for smoothing and drilling, sewing needles, as well as spiral bronze pendants, have been found in the area around Pula/Pola. The type of materials found in Bronze Age sites in Istria connects these with sites along the Danube. The inhabitants of Istria in the Bronze Age are known as Proto Illyrians. Greek pottery and a part of a statue of Apollo have been found, attesting to the presence or influence of Greek culture. Greek tradition attributed the foundation of Polai to the Colchians, mentioned in the context of the story of Jason and Medea, who had stolen the golden fleece. The Colchians, who had chased Jason into the northern Adriatic, were unable to catch him and ended up settling in a place they called Polai, signifying "city of refuge".
Ancient period
In classical antiquity, it was inhabited by the Histri, a Venetic or Illyrian tribe recorded by Strabo in the 1st century AD The Istrian peninsula was conquered by the Romans in 177 BC, starting a period of Romanization. The town was elevated to colonial rank between 46–45 BC as the tenth region of the late Roman Republic, under Julius Caesar. During that time the town grew and had at its zenith a population of about 30,000. It became a significant Roman port with a large surrounding area under its jurisdiction. During the civil war of 42 BC of the triumvirate of Octavian, Mark Antony and Lepidus against Caesar's assassins Brutus and Cassius, the town took the side of Cassius, since the town had been founded by Cassius Longinus, brother of Cassius. After Octavian's victory, the town was demolished. It was soon rebuilt at the request of Octavian's daughter Iulia and was then called Colonia Pietas Iulia Pola Pollentia Herculanea. The colony was part of Venetia et Histria, a region of Roman Italy. Great classical constructions were built of which a few remain. A great amphitheatre, Pula Arena, was constructed between 27 BC – 68 AD, much of it still standing to this day. The Romans...   ... (English)
Pula - Deutsch -> English  Français -> English  Polska -> English  Català -> English  České -> English  Lietuvos -> English  Norske -> English  Svenska -> English  Danske -> English  Suomalainen -> English  
Pula (Kroatië) - Nederlandse -> English  
Пула - Русский -> English  Український -> English  Српска -> English  
Pola - Italiano -> English  
Pula (Istria) - Español -> English  
プーラ (クロアチア) - 日本語 -> English  
Pula (Croácia) - Português -> English  
Póla - Magyar -> English  
普拉 - 简体中文 -> English  
by Panoramio