Virtual tour of Águas Livres Aqueduct. Panorama of Águas Livres Aqueduct. Maps, travel, photos, videos.

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Águas Livres Aqueduct

POI: 38.726667, -9.166667
The Águas Livres Aqueduct (Portuguese: Aqueduto das Águas Livres, pronounced: [ɐkɨˈdutu dɐʃ ˈaɡwɐʃ ˈlivɾɨʃ], "Aqueduct of the Free Waters") is a historic aqueduct in the city of Lisbon, Portugal. It is one of the most remarkable examples of 18th-century Portuguese engineering. The main course of the aqueduct covers 18 km, but the whole network of canals extends through nearly 58 km. The city of Lisbon has always suffered from the lack of drinking water, and King John V decided to build an aqueduct to bring water from sources in the parish of Caneças, in the modern municipality of Odivelas. The project was paid for by a special sales tax on beef, olive oil, wine, and other products.
History
Construction started in 1731 under the direction of Italian architect Antonio Canevari, replaced in 1732 by a group of Portuguese architects and engineers, including Manuel da Maia, Azevedo Fortes and José da Silva Pais. Between 1733 and 1736, the project was directed by Manuel da Maia, who in turn was replaced by Custódio Vieira, who would remain at the head of the project until around 1747. Custódio Vieira conceived the centerpiece of the aqueduct, the arches over the Alcantara valley, completed in 1744. A total of 35 arches cross the valley, covering 941 m. The tallest arches reach a height of 65 m, and many are pointed, reminiscent of arches in Gothic style. It is considered a masterpiece of engineering in the Baroque period. In 1748, although the project was still unfinished, the aqueduct finally started to bring water to the city of Lisbon, a fact celebrated in a commemorative arch built in the Amoreiras neighbourhood. From this period on, construction was overseen by other architects, including Carlos Mardel of Hungary and others. During the reigns of José I and Maria I, the network of canals and fountains was greatly enlarged.
Mãe d'Água
The Mãe d'Água (Mother of the Water) reservoir of the Amoreiras, the largest of the water reservoirs, was finished in 1834. This reservoir, with a capacity of 5,500 m³ of water, was designed by Carlos Mardel. It is now deactivated and can be visited as part of the Museu da Água (Water Museum).
Bibliography
Chelmicki, José Carlos Conrado de (2008). Memoria sobre o Aqueducto Geral de Lisboa feita por ordem do Ministerio das Obras Publicas em portaria de 15 de Fevereiro de 1856 (in Portuguese). Lisbon: : EPAL - Empresa Portuguesa das Águas Livres. p. 44. ISBN 9789899576100.
External links
(English) The Water Museum (English) Portuguese Institute for Architectural Heritage (Portuguese) General Bureau for National Buildings and Monuments (Portuguese) Virtual visit to the Water Museum (Portuguese) The Water Museum...   ... (English)
Aqueduto das Águas Livres - Deutsch -> English  Português -> English  
Aqueduc des Eaux Libres - Français -> English  
Acquedotto delle Acque Libere - Italiano -> English  
Acueducto de las Aguas Libres - Español -> English  
阿瓜里弗渡槽 - 简体中文 -> English  
by Panoramio
LISBOA - Aqueduto das Águas Livres (1748) , vista aérea           ***           LISBON Aqueduct  Free Water (1748) , aerial view)
LISBOA - Aqueduto das Águas Livres (1748) , vista aérea *** LISBON Aqueduct Free Water (1748) , aerial view)
Alfredo Henriques
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Amoreiras
Amoreiras
Rafael Anglada
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# 11 - Emozioni di architettura geometrica
# 11 - Emozioni di architettura geometrica
patano
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3D Lisbon by plane
3D Lisbon by plane
Jelmer Wielema
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Lisboa magestuosa
Lisboa magestuosa
Epi F.Villanueva
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LISBOA -  vista do ar *** LISBON - aerial view
LISBOA - vista do ar *** LISBON - aerial view
Alfredo Henriques
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Estufa fria - Kaltgewächshaus - Lisboa
Estufa fria - Kaltgewächshaus - Lisboa
AustrianAviationArt
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