Virtual tour of Bunker Hill, Los Angeles. Panorama of Bunker Hill, Los Angeles. Maps, travel, photos, videos.

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Bunker Hill, Los Angeles

POI: 34.052035, -118.250347
Bunker Hill is a historic prominence that traditionally separated Downtown Los Angeles from the rest of the city to the west before the hill was tunneled through at Second Street in 1924. In the late 20th century, the hill was lowered in elevation, and the entire area was redeveloped to supplant old frame and concrete buildings with modern high-rises and other structures for residences, commerce, entertainment and education. The Cathedral of Our Lady of the Angels is also located on Bunker Hill.
History
Early development
In 1867, a wealthy developer, Prudent Beaudry, purchased a majority of the hill's land. Because of the hill's excellent views of the Los Angeles Basin and the Los Angeles River, he knew that it would make for an opulent subdivision. He developed the peak of Bunker Hill with lavish two-story Victorian houses that became famous as homes for the upper-class residents of Los Angeles. Angels Flight, now dubbed "The World's Shortest Railway", took residents homeward from the bottom of the 33% grade and down again. Initially a residential suburb, Bunker Hill retained its exclusive character through the end of World War I, but in the face of increased urban growth fed by an extensive streetcar system, its wealthy residents began leaving for enclaves on the Westside and Pasadena. Bunker Hill's houses were increasingly sub-divided to accommodate renters. Still, Bunker Hill was at this time "Los Angeles's most crowded and urban neighborhood". By World War II the Pasadena Freeway, built to bring shoppers downtown, was taking more residents out. Additional post-war freeway construction left downtown comparatively empty of both people and services. The once-grand Victorian mansions of Bunker Hill became the home of impoverished pensioners.
Bunker Hill Redevelopment Project
In 1955, Los Angeles city planners decided that Bunker Hill required a massive slum clearance project. The top of Bunker Hill was cleared of its houses and then flattened as the first stage of the Bunker Hill Redevelopment Project to populate Bunker Hill with modern plazas and buildings. When the height limit of buildings for Los Angeles was finally raised (previously buildings were limited to 150 feet), developers built some of the tallest skyscrapers in the region to take advantage of the area's existing dense zoning. In approving such projects, the city sought to project a modern, sophisticated image. The project is the longest redevelopment project in Los Angeles history. The majority of the skyscrapers on Bunker Hill were built in the 1980s, with a new skyscraper or two being finished nearly every year. However, the momentum died down in the 1990s, shortly after the fifty-two story Two California Plaza was finished. In 1999, the vacancy rate for downtown commercial skyscrapers was 26%, one of the highest in the nation for that time. Planned office towers were canceled, including California Plaza Three, and the nearby four-towered Metropolis (brought back...   ... (English)
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by Panoramio
LA Night Skyline
LA Night Skyline
nattyb52
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LAnd of the Giants
LAnd of the Giants
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Los Angeles, Two California Plaza 228.6 m
Los Angeles, Two California Plaza 228.6 m
voyager747
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Los Angeles Downtown at night from Kawada Hotel - ASIER IBAÑEZ
Los Angeles Downtown at night from Kawada Hotel - ASIER IBAÑEZ
© Asier Ibañez
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Disney Concert Hall
Disney Concert Hall
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Wells Fargo Bank, Los Angeles
Wells Fargo Bank, Los Angeles
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Los Angeles,downtown(2003)
Los Angeles,downtown(2003)
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