Virtual tour of One Times Square. Panorama of One Times Square. Maps, travel, photos, videos.

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One Times Square

POI: 40.756421, -73.986488
One Times Square, also known as 1475 Broadway, the New York Times Building, the New York Times Tower, or simply as the Times Tower, is a 25 story, 363-foot (111-meter)-high skyscraper, designed by Cyrus L. W. Eidlitz (HLW International), located at 42nd Street and Broadway in New York City. The tower was originally built to serve as the headquarters of the local newspaper, The New York Times (which also gave its name to the area as a whole, known as Times Square); however, the Times stayed in the building for less than 10 years before moving to a new building on 229 West 43rd Street. Despite the Times leaving the building, One Times Square remained a major focal point of Times Square due to its annual New Year's Eve "ball drop" festivities (the ball itself has remained atop the tower year-round since 2009), and the introduction of an electronic news ticker at street-level in 1928. Following its sale to Lehman Brothers in 1995, One Times Square was re-purposed as an advertising location to take advantage of its prime location within the square. Most of the building's interior remains vacant (aside from its only major tenant, a Walgreens pharmacy which occupies its lower levels), while its exterior features a large number of traditional and electronic billboards. Due to the large amount of revenue that its ads pull, One Times Square is considered one of the most valuable advertising locations in the world.
Building history
The building, on the site of the Pabst Hotel, was originally completed in 1904 to serve as the new headquarters of The New York Times, which officially moved into the building in January 1905. The paper's owner, Adolph Ochs, also successfully persuaded the city to rename the surrounding area (then known as Longacre Square) after the newspaper, becoming Times Square. To help promote the new headquarters, the Times held a New Year's Eve event on December 31, 1903, welcoming the year of 1904 with a fireworks display set off from the roof of the building at midnight. The event was a success, attracting 200,000 spectators, and was continued annually until 1907. For 1908, Ochs replaced the display with what he thought would be a more spectacular event—the lowering of a lit ball down the building's flagpole at midnight, patterned off the use of time balls to indicate a certain time of day (the "ball drop" is still held on One Times Square to this day, attracting an average of one million spectators yearly). In 1913, only eight years after it moved to One Times Square, the Times moved its corporate headquarters to 229 West 43rd Street, which served as its home from 1913 to 2007. The Times has since moved to The New York Times Building on nearby Eighth Avenue. After leaving One Times Square, the Times still maintained ownership of the tower. On November 6, 1928, an electronic news ticker known as the Motograph News Bulletin (colloquially known as the "zipper") was introduced near the base of the building. The zipper originally consisted...   ... (English)
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by Panoramio
Busy sky
Busy sky
mabut
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Times Square
Times Square
© Kojak
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Times Square
Times Square
© Kojak
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NO FALTAN COLORES en TIMES
NO FALTAN COLORES en TIMES
[[[ PIXELECTA ]]]
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OPS!!
OPS!!
minusca
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Times Square at night
Times Square at night
funtor
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Times Square at night
Times Square at night
funtor
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