Virtual tour of Civic Center, San Francisco. Panorama of Civic Center, San Francisco. Maps, travel, photos, videos.

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Description  panorama

Civic Center, San Francisco

POI: 37.779167, -122.415833
The Civic Center in San Francisco, California, is an area of a few blocks north of the intersection of Market Street and Van Ness Avenue that contains many of the city's largest government and cultural institutions. It has two large plazas (Civic Center Plaza and United Nations Plaza) and a number of buildings in classical architectural style. The Bill Graham Civic Auditorium (formerly the Exposition Auditorium), the United Nations Charter was signed in the War Memorial Veterans Building's Herbst Theatre in 1945, leading to the creation of the United Nations. It is also where the 1951 Treaty of San Francisco (the peace treaty that officially ended the Pacific War with the Empire of Japan, which had surrendered in 1945) was signed. The San Francisco Civic Center was designated a National Historic Landmark in 1987 and listed in the National Register of Historic Places on October 10, 1978.
Location
The Civic Center is bounded by Market Street on the south, Franklin Street on the west, Turk Street on the north, and Leavenworth and Seventh streets on the east. The Civic Center is bounded by the Tenderloin neighborhood on the north and east and by the Hayes Valley neighborhood on the west; Market Street separates it from the South of Market or "SoMa" neighborhood.
History
The Civic Center was built in the early 20th century after an earlier city hall was destroyed in the 1906 earthquake and fire. Although the noted architect and urban planner Daniel Burnham had provided the city with plans for a neo-classical Civic Center shortly before the 1906 earthquake, his plans were never carried out. A temporary city hall was put up on Market Street, but planning for a more permanent structure and civic center did not take place for several years. The current civic center was planned by a group of local architects, chaired by John Galen Howard. The current City Hall was completed in 1915, in time for the Panama-Pacific Exposition. The War Memorial Opera House and its neighboring twin, the War Memorial Veterans Building (which together were the nucleus of the San Francisco War Memorial and Performing Arts Center), the Main Library, and the State and Old Federal buildings would be built later, during the 1920s and 1930s. During World War II, Army barracks and Victory gardens were constructed in the main plaza in front of City Hall and the Library. The 1950s through the 1970s and 1980s saw tall post-modernist Federal and State buildings constructed in the area; an underground exhibition facility, Brooks Hall, was built beneath the Civic Center Plaza in 1958. The Louise M. Davies Symphony Hall and Harold L. Zellerbach Rehearsal Hall were added in 1980. The 1990s saw the construction of a new Main Library with the conversion of the old Main Library building into the Asian Art Museum, and the removal of all public benches. In 1998, the city officially renamed part of the plaza the Joseph L. Alioto Performing Arts Piazza after the former mayor. Its central location...   ... (English)
Civic Center (San Francisco) - Français -> English  
市政中心 (旧金山) - 简体中文 -> English  
by Panoramio
City Hall Reflection
City Hall Reflection
Julia Wahl
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Asian Culture Musseum
Asian Culture Musseum
Eduardo Manchón
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The Art Institute of California on Market Street
The Art Institute of California on Market Street
BMV
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388 San Francisco, Gewölbe der City Hall
388 San Francisco, Gewölbe der City Hall
Daniel Meyer
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San Francisco City Hall
San Francisco City Hall
Jorge Martinez R
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City Hall in San Francisco
City Hall in San Francisco
BMV
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Stevenson st.
Stevenson st.
javierbranas
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